New Investigator Awards 2022-2023

We are pleased to announce the winners of the 2022-2023 New Investigator Awards!

The New Investigator Award funding opportunity was developed to support new and early career investigators, as they further their career development in Alzheimer's Disease and Alzheimer's Disease Related Dementias (AD/ADRD) research.

This year's New Investigator Awards were highly competitive, with a substantial increase in the number of applications and greater participation across the ADRC Community. NACC received 51 applications from 29 different ADRCS.

NACC would like to thank the Scientific Review, Ad-Hoc and NACC Steering Committee members for their considerable efforts and support of the New Investigator Award program.
We congratulate all of you on your New Investigator Award. The projects you have proposed are exceptional and will make an important contribution to Alzheimer's Disease and Alzheimer's Disease Related Dementias (AD/ADRD) research.
Andrew Yang, PhD

Andrew Yang, PhD

University of California, San Francisco ADRC

Understanding how human brain vascular cells mediate genetic risk for Alzheimer's disease

Andrew Yang, PhD

Andrew is a Sandler Faculty Fellow at UCSF. His lab develops new molecular approaches to decode the meaning, mechanisms, and therapeutic relevance of protein and immune crosstalk between the brain and body.

Yuriko Katsumata, PhD

Yuriko Katsumata, PhD

University of Kentucky ADRC

Pathway-specific polygenic risk scores on mixed neuropathologies

Yuriko Katsumata, PhD

Yuriko Katsumata, PhD, is a Research Assistant Professor of Biostatistics at the University of Kentucky Alzheimer's Disease Research Center (UK-ADRC) with a focus in epidemiological and statistical genetic studies of neurodegenerative diseases.

Jaime Ramos-Cejudo, PhD

Jaime Ramos-Cejudo, PhD

New York University ADRC

Studying the contribution of neutrophil mediated inflammation to AD risk

Jaime Ramos-Cejudo, PhD

Dr. Ramos-Cejudo is an Assistant Professor at the New York University's Department of Psychiatry. His goal is to increase our understanding of why some people develop Alzheimer’s disease (AD) and others do not. Specifically, the role of vascular and inflammatory dysfunction in AD by using advanced biomarkers and computational tools.

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NACC is funded by the National Institute on Aging (U24 AG072122) and located in the Department of Epidemiology at the University of Washington School of Public Health, Walter A. Kukull, Ph.D., Director. © 2022 University of Washington